Auckland Radio 1946-1949

1946:

Two operators at Musick Memorial Radio Station in 1946

Two operators at Musick Memorial Radio Station in 1946. Each has two HRO-type receivers. Doug Morris refers to the operators as George Reading (left) and Ted Healy.1

Auckland Radio ZLD operator Nobby Clarke in 1946.

Auckland Radio operator Nobby Clarke in 1946.

BV Richards checks transmission instruments at  Musick Point Air Radio Station

BV Richards checks transmission instruments at Musick Point Air Radio Station, 29 Aug 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

BV Richards sends a telegraph message from Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946

BV Richards sends a telegraph message from Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

Notes to photo above:
Larry Richards copying weather from VNHQ Melbourne directly on to the teleprinter connected to the meteorological office at Mechanics Bay. A weather report consisted of five-figure groups, and was translated into a conventional weather report by Met Office staff. The second printer provided a direct circuit to air operations (also at Mechanics Bay) with a link to Whenuapai Air Base. In the background cane be seen the Collier & Beale 941 SWB receiver with spare coils and the aerial selection panel.2
– Doug Morris

N Grewell-Cooke, testing a receiver at, Musick Point Air Radio Station, Auckland, 29 August 1946

N Grewell-Cooke testing a receiver at Musick Point Air Radio Station, 29 August 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

ER Wilcox, supervisor, in the operating room at Musick Point Air Station, Howick, Auckland, 29 August 1946.

ER (Ted) Wilcox, supervisor, in the operating room at Musick Point Air Station, Howick, Auckland, 29 August 1946. Photo: Whites Aviation

Notes to photo above:
In the background can be seen the loudspeaking telephone (centre rack), and in the right hand rack a general purpose amplifier, order wire and main patch panel giving access to the emergency lines, keying circuits and way lines to the individual operating positions.3
– Doug Morris

Radio operator EW Ritchie, working at the Musick Point Air Radio Station, 29 August 1946.

Radio operator EW Ritchie, working at the Musick Point Air Radio Station, 29 August 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

R McVissen, F Fleetwood and Lloyd 'Cookie' Douglas at Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946

R McVissen, F Fleetwood and Lloyd ‘Cookie’ Douglas at Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

The first name on the photo caption above may be incorrect, as Doug Morris refers in his book to these operators as Bob McVicker, Frank Fleetwood and “Cookie” Douglas.

LG Skull at Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946.

Station Manager LG Skull at Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

Radio operator RD Goodman at Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946

Radio operator RD Goodman at Musick Memorial Radio Station, 29 August 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

RD Goodman at Musick Point Air Radio Station

RD Goodman at Musick Point Air Radio Station, 29 Aug 1946.
Photo: Whites Aviation

Operators (L to R): LJ Young, N [Masters?] and E Ritchie, 29 August 1946.

Operators (L to R): LJ Young, N [Masters?] and E Ritchie, 29 August 1946. There appears to be a landline sounder on the desk at right. Photo: Whites Aviation

Transmitters for Auckland Radio in 1946

“The transmitting hall is located three miles back along the point from the main building. It houses 18 transmitting sets, and the largest has a power of three kilowatts, while the smallest is 100 watts. The transmitters have a selection of 29 aerials spread over an area of 35 acres. Miles of underground cables connect the transmitters with the main building.” Photo: Whites Aviation, 29 August 1946

Notes to photo above:
View of the transmitting hall from the entrance. On the left can be seen three AWA HF transmitters: #68, #536 and #67. At the rear are three Collier & Beale HF transmitters. In the right corner is AWA #100, then coming up the right hand side are C&B #666 (500 kc/s), C&B #873 (HF), AT3 (HF), Collins #3 (500W) and Collins #15 (3kW). At the desk is Ron Turner, with Owen Pepper and Keith Bone working on #67.4
– Doug Morris

Collins 3kW auto-tune transmitter at Auckland Radio, 29 August 1946

Ron Turner and Keith Bone with a 3kW Collins 12-channel auto-tune transmitter, 29 August 1946. The three cabinets are (from left): power supply, driver/final amplifier, modulator. At left is a 500W Collins transmitter. Photo: Whites Aviation, Alexander Turnbull Library

1947:

Auckland Radio staff 1947

More information is needed about this photo, which came from Nobby Clarke. The first four people in the front row appear to be Frank Young, Harry Smart, Morrie Parsons and Laurie Emens. The back row includes Bob Hutchinson and Bob Harris. There are two notes on the back of the photo: ‘1939 Wellington’ and ‘1946 Musick Point.’ Laurie Emens is in the spot normally reserved for ‘the boss,’ but in 1939 he was a Radio Inspector in Wellington, and he did not become Superintendent of Auckland Radio until 1947. So it is assumed that this photo was probably taken at Auckland Radio between 1947 and 1953 when he retired.

As an RNZN Boy Telegraphist, my first draft on completing 14 months training in Sept 1947 was to HMS Bellona/GCQQ, later to become HMNZS with callsign ZMSF. Initially, Boy Tels were allowed in the comms office only from 4pm to 6pm (first dog watch) to listen (double-banked with a qualified operator) on 500 kcs distress freq. I recall hearing Marine Phoenix/AOOG – which came to Auckland to transport to the USA war brides of US servicemen – working ZLD. Bellona was alongside Calliiope wharf at the time.
Kelvin Brayshaw (Apr 2018)

Radio operators at Musick Memorial Radio Station in 1947

Radio operators at Musick Memorial Radio Station in 1947.

1948:

A rather cryptic message to Auckland Radio staff from Laurie Emens, Superintendent, admonishing them for 'nattering' on the circuits

A rather cryptic message to Auckland Radio staff from Laurie Emens, Superintendent, admonishing them for ‘nattering’ on the circuits

1949:

Senior technician Jack Hogan making installation tests of a 'fan marker' transmitter at Auckland Radio in 1949

Senior technician Jack Hogan making installation tests of a Civil Aviation Authority ‘fan marker’ transmitter at Auckland Radio.
Photo: New Zealand Free Lance, 27 Jul 1949

The Fan Marker Beacon (pictured above) was being overhauled on behalf of CAA. This transmitter was temporarily installed by Post Office staff at various sites on the outskirts of Auckland. This was to enable site evaluation and in-flight checks to be undertaken for a proposed navigational aid system for the Auckland area.5
– Doug Morris

1950 – 1959


Notes
1. Morris, D.C. (2002). Auckland Radio, Alpha & Omega. Waitakere City, NZ: Copy Out West. p. 55.
2. Morris, D.C. (2002). Auckland Radio, Alpha & Omega. Waitakere City, NZ: Copy Out West. p. 58.
3. Morris, D.C. (2002). Auckland Radio, Alpha & Omega. Waitakere City, NZ: Copy Out West. p. 57.
4. Morris, D.C. (2002). Auckland Radio, Alpha & Omega. Waitakere City, NZ: Copy Out West. p. 65.
5. Morris, D.C. (2002). Auckland Radio, Alpha & Omega. Waitakere City, NZ: Copy Out West. p. 64.